CASTOREUM

RUB IT ON YA FACE

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whatthatsmellslike:

▶ Soulection ~ The Sound of Tomorrow
http://facebook.com/soulection | http://twitter.com/soulection
▶ DL Compilation: https://soulection.bandcamp.com/album/stussy-x-soulection-compilation

This compilation is inspired by our collaboration with one of the most culturally relevant and timeless brands, Stussy.

We’ve taken dozens of tracks into consideration to curate the finest selection of progressive music from around the world to bring visibility to the future sound. Because there is so much talent out there, it was challenging to pull this compilation together to showcase a progression and cohesive flow that reflects both Stussy and Soulection cultures respectively.

You will see familiar official Soulection artists on this compilation as well some new talent from forward-thinking and ambitious producers, emcees and vocalists that we’re excited about and feel have a bright future.

Our partnership with the iconic brand includes a ‘Soulection Tribe’ limited t-shirt designed by Stussy as well as a physical in-store event and after party at our Sound Of Tomorrow Los Angeles monthly at The Echoplex on 9.5.14.

Special Thanks to all the artists: @zikomo @iamnoboodi @goldlink @orijanus @beatsbyesta @mr_carmack @samgellaitry @connor-pearson-1 @evilneedleprod @10A @takugotbeats @jayprincemusic @sangobeats @jdreidmusic @sivey @thisjaylouis @pyrmdplaza @mikos-da-gawd @jarreauvandal @starro @lelandaleemfakir @midnightabjo

Much love to Neek and the whole Stussy team for making this collaboration a reality.

Compiled & Executive Produced by Joe Kay
Design by Andre Power
Words by Jacqueline Schneider

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I will repeat.

cwyonaiyama:

It is so incredibly frustrating to grow up having my culture made fun of, mocked and torn apart to then see non-Japanese people pick and choose what parts they like, and act like they’re so cool and accepting for “embracing” another culture. Especially, when a mixed-race, or non-fluent Japanese speaking person like me and many others get told that we can’t embrace our race because we are; “Not really Asian.”

News flash; you’re not really Asian. Eating sushi, watching anime, and listening to JPop does not make you Japanese. It does not make you an expert on my culture and certainly does not mean you can “teach” me about it. I will embrace my culture all I want to, without your unnecessary permission.

If you can just post any random word in katakana/hiragana/kanji, for your album cover or art piece then I can a post a word that’s ACTUALLY related to my artwork. If you can be inspired by Japanese folklore and woodblock then I SURE AS HELL CAN BE INSPIRED TOO.

You know what makes you Japanese, Korean or Chinese? Being born, Japanese, Korean or Chinese. That’s it.

You eat curry and you know what Takoyaki is? You love Studio Ghibli? Good for you… step to me when your mom makes some bomb ass Nikujaga and Okayu, and maybe you can sit next to me and watch HAUNTEDじゃんくしょん. Bitch.

(via whatwhiteswillneverknow)

5,730 notes

Oct. 20 3:15 pm

justice4mikebrown:

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

402 notes

ethiopienne:

Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong

America is the land of opportunity, just for some more than others.
That’s because, in large part, inequality starts in the crib. Rich parents can afford to spend more time and money on their kids, and that gap has only grown the past few decades. Indeed, economists Greg Duncan and Richard Murnane calculate that, between 1972 and 2006, high-income parents increased their spending on “enrichment activities” for their children by 151 percent in inflation-adjusted terms, compared to 57 percent for low-income parents.
But, of course, it’s not just a matter of dollars and cents. It’s also a matter of letters and words. Affluent parents talk to their kids three more hours a week on average than poor parents, which is critical during a child’s formative early years. That’s why, as Stanford professor Sean Reardonexplains, “rich students are increasingly entering kindergarten much better prepared to succeed in school than middle-class students,” and they’re staying that way.
It’s an educational arms race that’s leaving many kids far, far behind.
It’s depressing, but not nearly so much as this:
Even poor kids who do everything right don’t do much better than rich kids who do everything wrong. Advantages and disadvantages, in other words, tend to perpetuate themselves. You can see that in the above chart, based on a new paper from Richard Reeves and Isabel Sawhill, presented at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s annual conference, which is underway.
Specifically, rich high school dropouts remain in the top about as much as poor college grads stay stuck in the bottom — 14 versus 16 percent, respectively. Not only that, but these low-income strivers are just as likely to end up in the bottom as these wealthy ne’er-do-wells. Some meritocracy.
What’s going on? Well, it’s all about glass floors and glass ceilings. Rich kids who can go work for the family business — and, in Canada at least, 70 percent of the sons of the top 1 percent do just that — or inherit the family estate don’t need a high school diploma to get ahead. It’s an extreme example of what economists call “opportunity hoarding.” That includes everything from legacy college admissions to unpaid internships that let affluent parents rig the game a little more in their children’s favor.
But even if they didn’t, low-income kids would still have a hard time getting ahead. That’s, in part, because they’re targets for diploma mills that load them up with debt, but not a lot of prospects. And even if they do get a good degree, at least when it comes to black families, they’re more likely to still live in impoverished neighborhoods that keep them disconnected from opportunities.

It’s not quite a heads-I-win, tails-you-lose game where rich kids get better educations, yet still get ahead even if they don’t—but it’s close enough. And if it keeps up, the American Dream will be just that.

ethiopienne:

Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong

America is the land of opportunity, just for some more than others.

That’s because, in large part, inequality starts in the crib. Rich parents can afford to spend more time and money on their kids, and that gap has only grown the past few decades. Indeed, economists Greg Duncan and Richard Murnane calculate that, between 1972 and 2006, high-income parents increased their spending on “enrichment activities” for their children by 151 percent in inflation-adjusted terms, compared to 57 percent for low-income parents.

But, of course, it’s not just a matter of dollars and cents. It’s also a matter of letters and words. Affluent parents talk to their kids three more hours a week on average than poor parents, which is critical during a child’s formative early years. That’s why, as Stanford professor Sean Reardonexplains, “rich students are increasingly entering kindergarten much better prepared to succeed in school than middle-class students,” and they’re staying that way.

It’s an educational arms race that’s leaving many kids far, far behind.

It’s depressing, but not nearly so much as this:

Even poor kids who do everything right don’t do much better than rich kids who do everything wrong. Advantages and disadvantages, in other words, tend to perpetuate themselves. You can see that in the above chart, based on a new paper from Richard Reeves and Isabel Sawhill, presented at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s annual conference, which is underway.

Specifically, rich high school dropouts remain in the top about as much as poor college grads stay stuck in the bottom — 14 versus 16 percent, respectively. Not only that, but these low-income strivers are just as likely to end up in the bottom as these wealthy ne’er-do-wells. Some meritocracy.

What’s going on? Well, it’s all about glass floors and glass ceilings. Rich kids who can go work for the family business — and, in Canada at least, 70 percent of the sons of the top 1 percent do just that — or inherit the family estate don’t need a high school diploma to get ahead. It’s an extreme example of what economists call “opportunity hoarding.” That includes everything from legacy college admissions to unpaid internships that let affluent parents rig the game a little more in their children’s favor.

But even if they didn’t, low-income kids would still have a hard time getting ahead. That’s, in part, because they’re targets for diploma mills that load them up with debt, but not a lot of prospects. And even if they do get a good degree, at least when it comes to black families, they’re more likely to still live in impoverished neighborhoods that keep them disconnected from opportunities.

It’s not quite a heads-I-win, tails-you-lose game where rich kids get better educations, yet still get ahead even if they don’t—but it’s close enough. And if it keeps up, the American Dream will be just that.

Filed under capitalism economics poverty classism